On Thursday, March 14th, 2019, at 8pm, the fifth concert of the 2018-2019 Interpretations series’ Thirtieth Anniversary Season presents striking music sets from both vocalist and composer Joan La Barbara, and mixed-instrumentation group Ensemble Metrix, led by violinist Tom Chiu.

Held at Roulette, 509 Atlantic Ave, Brooklyn, NY, tickets are $20 for adults / $15 for students & seniors, and available online.

The perennially influential and innovative vocalist/composer Joan La Barbara presents new material from her ongoing opera-in-progress, Dreams of Water Beyond One’s Depth, inspired by the lives and work of the iconic Virginia Woolf and the enigmatic Joseph Cornell, with lyrics by the award-winning Vietnamese-American novelist Monique Truong, and featuring an ensemble of voices, instruments, synthesizer, and sonic atmosphere.

Tom Chiu’s Ensemble Metrix is a mixed-instrumentation group exploring the recontextualization of music in a variety of styles and genres. Using material from the broad canon of popular and underground music, Chiu deconstructs and distorts melodic hooks and motivic riffs, and weaves the material into an extended, minimalistic jam. The resulting structured score represents an analogue to a dee-jay’s pre-determined playlist. Replacing turntables and records, the musicians produce the music live, each injecting personal flair in the final mix. Joining Ensemble Metrix will be some of Chiu’s favorite collaborators, including Meaghan Burke, Sara Schoenbeck, Charles Waters, Peter Zummo, and other special guests.

About Interpretations: 

“When we started, this was a real need, especially for the more experimental new music,” says Founder and Artistic Director Thomas Buckner. “Now we are experiencing a blossoming of new music groups and solo performers, which makes the series necessary in a new way. There are so many exceptional composers and performers who need a great place to perform.”

The Interpretations series, now in its thirtieth season, is a New York-based concert series focusing on the relationship between contemporary composers and their interpreters. Sometimes the interpreters are the composers themselves; more often, the series features performers who specialize in the interpretation of new music. 

For its 30th Anniversary, Interpretations has assembled an eclectic line-up of innovative composers and their interpreters, representing a wide variety of approaches to music making. The Interpretations Series is dedicated to nurturing the relationship of innovative composers with the growing community of new music virtuoso performers. 

REMAINING 2019 SERIES LINEUP

Thursday, April 4, 2019: Thomas Buckner (with Joseph Kubera, Melanie Genin, William Winant, & James Ilgenfrtz)

Thursday, May 2, 2019: Annie Gosfield (with Harris and Chow); Edmund Camplon (with Marilyn Nonken, Manuel Laufer, and others)

Thursday, June 6, 2019: String Noise (Pauline Kim Harris and Conrad Harris); The String Trio of New York (featuring James Emery, Toni Marino, Rob Thomas)

 

 

Kinga Cserjési and Deborah Carmichael

In anticipation of Libero Canto’s upcoming New York City workshop (February 15-17th), singers Deborah Carmichael and Kinga Cserjési would like to share this supplemental film: “Libero Canto – Voice is Breath,” made by award-winning director Andrea Simon in 2001. The film focuses on the work of Edvin Szamosi (son of founder Lajos Szamosi), and the history of the Libero Canto Approach.


Click to play “Libero Canto – Voice is Breath”

The film, while made almost 20 years ago, still serves as an inspiring introduction to the approach, which continues to evolve and thrive through the work of dedicated teachers and students in many cities including New York, Toronto, Florence, The Hague, and Budapest. Carmichael and Cserjési feel the film will be of interest to many different people, among them singing teachers, music teachers, teachers of children, singers, musicians, actors, dancers, anyone in the performing arts, and anyone interested in the arts, pedagogy or psychology.

The path to free singing” was first developed by Lajos Szamosi in Budapest before the Second World War. This unprecedented pedagogic approach was carried on and further developed by Lajos’s son Edvin Szamosi, who taught singing in Vienna and New York City for more than 50 years, until his death in 2014.

Through interviews and footage of lessons and rehearsals, “Libero Canto – Voice is Breath” draws the viewer into the musical and human evolution of Edvin Szamosi’s students both in New York, and in Vienna. The care, love, and attention to detail with which the film is made reflect these same qualities in Edvin’s teaching. With gentleness, rigor, and humor, Mr. Szamosi guides his students towards increasing freedom, spontaneity, and authenticity.


Deborah and Kinga are still accepting applicants for their February workshop.
for more information, click here or email [email protected].

This February 15th through 17th, singers Deborah Carmichael and Kinga Cserjési will offer a three-day workshop to give participants a thorough introduction to the Libero Canto Approach. The workshop includes individual singing lessons, musical work, and sessions in listening to historical and contemporary vocal recordings, and will be held at the Rudolf Steiner School, 15 E. 78th Street in New York City. The cost is $200, and space is limited to 8 singers.

To apply, or for more information, email [email protected] by February 1st with a short statement about your musical background and why you are interested in the workshop. You may also be asked to provide a recording. All vocal types are welcome. Those who would like to experience the Libero Canto Approach prior to the workshop are invited to take a free introductory lesson with Kinga Cserjési.

Moreover, for those who apply for the workshop by January 18, a 20% discount ($160) will be offered if accepted. (Additional financial assistance may be available upon request – please contact [email protected] by January 18.)


Singers Deborah Carmichael and Kinga Cserjési

Using Early Italian arias and ensemble pieces, the workshop is designed to give participants a thorough introduction to the Libero Canto approach: a way of teaching singing that leads to freedom and naturalness of vocal expression. It is not a method or specialized technique, rather a process and attitude toward singing and music making.

A central idea of Libero Canto is that the release of excess physical tension and force allows the body to become genuinely responsive to the singer’s musical feeling and imagination, thereby giving singing the spontaneity and vitality of true expression. (The name ‘Libero Canto’ comes from “la via al libero canto,” the path to free singing. This approach was originated by Lajos Szamosi in Budapest before the Second World War.)


SCHEDULE (subject to change) 
* Friday, Feb. 15
5:00 – 8:00 p.m. Introduction and listening session

* Saturday, Feb. 16
10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Individual lessons (auditing encouraged);
2:30 – 6:30 p.m. Musical work and listening session (all present)

* Sunday, Feb. 17
12:00 – 3:00 p.m. Individual lessons (auditing encouraged);
4:30 – 7:30 p.m. Musical work and conclusion (all present)


for more information, please visit liberocanto.com


Violist Jeongeun Park is set to make her debut at Carnegie Hall on December 17th, 2018 at 8pm. (Tickets are available through Carnegie Hall’s website.)

A monumental moment in Park’s career, she wanted to share her program notes about the four works she will be performing.

Poetically conceived by Park around themes of romance and fantasy, this program moves from dreamy beginnings to a serious and somber conclusion, with Shostakovich’s Viola Sonata, composed right before the composer’s death.


Carl Reinecke (1824-1910),
3 Fantasiestücke for Viola and Piano, Op. 43

As a pianist, violinist, composer, conductor and teacher, the German composer Carl Reinecke (1824-1910) was one of the most versatile musicians of his time. He was born in Altona, then under Danish rule and initially trained under his father (Rudolf Reinecke, 1759-1883). The younger Reinecke began composing at the age of seven, and debuted as a pianist at the age of twelve. He underwent a remarkable musical education, studying with the likes of Felix Mendelssohn and Robert Schumann. Reinecke’s early works were faithful to the early masters of the Romantic era who trained him while in Leipzig. 3 Fantasiestücke for Viola and Piano, Op. 43 was composed in 1844. The opening, Andante, explores a warm, song-like viola melody while the piano accompanies with rapidly flowing triplets. The second movement contrasts the first, resembling a scherzo with a folk-like refrain. The last movement, Molto Vivace, depicts the frenzied crowds of annual fairs carried on from the medieval era.

Sergei Prokofiev (1891-1953); arr. Vadim Borissovsky,
Selected pieces from the ballet Romeo and Juliet, Op. 64

Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet has influenced artists and musicians for centuries. The epitome of a tragic love story, it has been adapted to countless genres and forms such as opera, ballet, symphony, theater and film. Russian Composer Sergei Prokofiev’s interpretation initially resulted in music for ballet, written in 1935. The composer subsequently arranged the music as a standalone piece for orchestra.  Three Suites from Romeo and Juliet, Op.64. Following the success of the second version, Prokofiev reduced the score for Ten Pieces for Piano, in Op.75. The viola transcription was made by Vadim Borisovsky, a founding member of the Beethoven Quartet and professor at the Moscow Conservatory. Borisovsky is an important figure in the expansion of the viola repertoire. He is responsible the hundred arrangements. Despite the challenges of arranging and reducing a piece for large forces, the two instruments are able to imitate of the colour and textural sophistication of the orchestral version.

Gabriel Fauré (1845-1924),
Après un rêve (After a Dream), Op.7 No.1

The French composer Gabriel Fauré was a composer of immense technical skill. His ability to blend elements from seemingly disparate styles and eras made him an important bridge to the music of the twentieth century. Fauré studied with Camille Saint-Saëns, and went on to teach influential modern era figures such as Claude Debussy and Nadia Boulanger. Written between 1870 and 1877, Après un rêve features one the composer’s most beloved melodies. The piece, anticipates the impressionist style of later French composers. In Après un rêve , Fauré draws the poetry of Romain Bussine. Much like the contents of the poem, the melodic gestures are full of affection and nostalgia.

Dmitri Shostakovich (1906-1975),
Sonata for Viola and Piano, Op. 147

Along with Prokofiev, Dmitri Shostakovich is a towering figure of twentieth century Russian music. Despite the many limitations imposed on artists in the U.S.S.R., Shostakovich was a prolific composer and pianist with a distinctive style. Written in 1975, the Sonata for Viola and Piano, Op.147 was his final work. This piece was composed in 1975 and dedicated to Fyodor Druzhinin, a violist of the Beethoven Quartet, who replaced the founding member, Vadim Borisovsky as violist from 1964-1988. The piece was premiered in October of 1975, shortly after Shostakovich died. This viola sonata has three movements with a slow-fast-slow structure. In the first movement, the viola opens the theme with the pizzicato gestures continues on with a layered texture that mixes different melodic elements. The second movement is more rhythmically focused and direct than the first. It relies more on concentrated, often jagged melodic motives. The third movement, the composer blends his own ideas with borrowed material from Beethoven’s piano sonata No.14, ‘Quasi una Fantasia’, also known as the Moonlight Sonata. The final movement gradually fades away, almost as if the composer is referencing his own death.


For more information about Jeongeun Park, please visit her website.
For tickets to her upcoming Carnegie Hall debut, click here.

Jeongeun Park will perform works by Reinecke, Prokofiev, Fauré and Shostakovich

On Monday December 17, 2018 at 8pm, violist Jeongeun Park, along with pianist Eric Zuber, will celebrate her New York City concert debut as well as Carnegie Hall debut with a recital at Weill Recital Hall, Carnegie Hall, 57th Street and Seventh Avenue, New York, NY.

Tickets are $20, and are available at carnegiehall.org or by calling 212-247-7800.

Program:

Carl Reinecke Drei Phantasiestücke Op. 43
Sergei Prokofiev Suite from Romeo and Juliet, Op.64
Gabriel Fauré Après un rêve
Dmitri Shostakovich Sonata for Viola and Piano, Op.147 

Poetically conceived by Park around themes of romance and fantasy, this program moves from dreamy beginnings to a serious and somber conclusion, with Shostakovich’s Viola Sonata, composed right before the composer’s death.


Born in Seoul, South Korea, Jeongeun Park has been actively performing throughout the U.S. and Asia as a soloist and chamber musician. Park was the top prize winner of the Kookmin Ilbo Youngsan Art Chamber Competition, Eumak Journal Competition, and Sungshin University Competition, and has appeared in numerous solo and chamber music concerts in Seoul.

Her busy performing schedule has included her solo debut recital at the Youngsan Art Hall, Sookmyung Orchestra’s concerts at the Seoul Arts Center, KBS Hall and Jang Cheon Art Hall. Park also served as Principal Viola of the Sookmyung Orchestra, Assistant Principal Viola of the Gwacheon Symphony Orchestra, and has been a member of the Aspen Festival Orchestra.

Park earned her Bachelor’s degree at Sookmyung Women’s University under the tutelage of Professor Do-Yeon Kim in Seoul, South Korea. In the US, Park began her studies under Professor Catharine Carroll Lees in 2010 at the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music. She earned her Masters of Music, Artist Diploma and Doctorate of Musical Arts at CCM where she is currently a member of the adjunct viola faculty. Park has participated in many international summer music festivals including the Aspen Music Festival, the Miyazaki Music Festival, and the Just Vivace Music Festival.

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